Aligning your plan

Today we are reviewing your meeting notes, providing feedback on your progress so far, then pushing to organize your discussion online and in class.

Review meeting notes

  1. Find your meeting notes in this Google folder and take 5-10 minutes to update this document to reflect any decisions you’ve made since.
  2. Comment on the meeting notes from other groups in our class. As you do, you might consider:
    Pointing out moments that you would look forward to discussing or knowing more about.
    Asking questions — for clarity/knowledge, but also for discussion later.
    Suggesting a counter-technology, or liking one of the options listed
  3. Once you’ve read and commented on others’ meeting notes, regroup to review the comments that other made on your meeting notes. Share any new ideas you gained that might be useful to your discussion.
  4. Add a section at the end of your document called NEW IDEAS that lists them.

Planning for discussion

Once your group feels like it has a strong grasp on your phenomenon, you’ll need to align 4 things:

  • your reading(s), which should get at the complexity, history, and relevance of your chosen phenomenon
  • your Twitter chat questions, which should be focused mostly on our experiences with, opinions about, or responses to the phenomenon
  • your in-class discussion questions, which will be about the phenomenon, but more importantly the reading. These will build from the Twitter chat the night before.
  • your counter-technology, which will go beyond common-sense approaches you’d see on your local evening news broadcast.

By “align” I mean that these four elements should work together and not feel like a potpourri of topics. If you are feeling that way, it means your phenomenon is too broad; try starting with the counter-technology and work backward.


Activity: Choose a reading for your discussion and develop two sets of discussion questions: one set for Twitter and one set for in-class. Aim for 3-5 questions per set. Do this together in a Google Doc that you share with me.

You might want to review the document I shared last week on writing good questions and avoiding bad ones. You also might review the link I shared from Hootsuite on leading Tweet chats. One key suggestion is this one:

Most Twitter chats follow a Q&A format so you should also come up with five to 10 questions in advance, and try to predict answers so you have some responses prepared.

There should be a fair amount of flexibility for Twitter chats to develop on their own, but it doesn’t hurt to be as prepared as possible.

You can also create graphics or GIFs in advance to include in your chat posts, or even turn your questions into graphics to make them stand out in your followers’ feeds.


Homework for Thursday, 10/26

Finish your discussion plans: finalize your chosen reading(s) and have drafts of both sets of questions. We’ll continue to review these in class on Thursday and review the evaluation forms for your groups. Group 1 will lead us off on Tuesday, 10/31.